Documenting, responding to, and becoming embedded within Assange’s circle, Poitras cannot resolve to be fully in or out of the film, and cannot get to the end of this story. Trump had not yet been elected when Risk premiered at Cannes in 2016—pre-Podesta emails, pre-commutation of Chelsea Manning’s imprisonment. At Risk in May 2017 is my first time watching Trump’s election in a theater. The images feel suddenly already historical, familiar and cold. I feel stirred and depleted. The events of the film keep unfolding; in May 2017 the about-to-be fired F.B.I. Director James Comey calls WikiLeaks “intelligence porn.” Comey says this dismissively (“there’s nothing that even smells ‘journalistic’ about this kind of conduct”)—but maybe there’s another dimension to this phrase. Poitras’s film captures an eroticism hovering between a plugged-in inner circle and its diffuse audience, between radical action and tired power dynamics. The internet is both subject and vehicle of self and sexuality...

— “Intelligence Porn,” review of Laura Poitras’s Risk, Brooklyn Rail, 2017.

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